Ms. Fergusson is a Reading Recovery™ teacher helping children who struggle in learning to read and write.  Children in the Reading Recovery program gain life long literacy skills.  Reading Recovery™ is a short-term intervention for first graders having extreme difficulty with early reading and writing. Specially trained teachers work individually with students in daily 30-minute lessons lasting 12 to 20 weeks.  
Ms. Fergusson is also a part of Dublin School's Early Literacy Initiative (ELI).  ELI is a program designed to provide qualified Kindergarteners extended time for practice and experience with literacy skills.
                                        How you can help at home 
Show an interest in your child's reading!  Read the books brought home each day after Reading Recovery lessons. Spending 10 to 20 minutes reading with your child each day will make a big difference! Click on the links in the next column. Check out Pinterest for fun and easy at home activities you can do together to help learn letters, sounds, names and words. 

Reading Recovery Newsletters

Dear Parents,                                                                                  November 16 2017

Thank you to everyone who returned the invitation to our Thomas Family Reading Night on Tuesday November 28, 2017. We look forward to seeing you, having dinner together, sharing free books and practicing ways you can help your child become a stronger reader, too. If you want to come, but missed the deadline, please email me ASAP!

Thanksgiving approaching an it is the perfect time for your reader to share a book with extended family and adult friends. Think of how wonderful it will make your child feel!

I will be sending home the reading bag stuffed with many books. Be sure your child is reading 2 or 3 (or more!) each day. It is very important to practice each day in order to keep improving.   I will put a special reading log in the bag to help keep track of the books, too.

Familiar reading is purposeful in helping your child become a confident reader.

A few reminders….

1. Each time your child reads a book they have read before, they discover something new about the print, story, language or pictures in the book.

2. Sounding out words is NOT an effective strategy for students who struggle and are in special reading programs, as your child is, at school. Just think how it sounds when a child tries to sound out the word l-o-o-k-i-n-g. It is best if your child gets the word started with its beginning letter sound and then thinks what word would make sense. Your child may have to try this a few times before he or she figures the word out, but that is OK. We use this strategy every day in Reading Support.

3. Good readers read EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. Reading books more than one time allows your child to see words again and again, freeing up their mind to think more about the message, and encourages confidence and fluency. When your child reads fluently, their reading sounds like talking.

Ms. Fergusson

ELI Newsletters

Dear Families,                                                             November 16, 2017

Thank you to everyone who returned the invitation to our Thomas Family Reading Night on Tuesday November 28, 2017. We look forward to seeing you, having dinner together, sharing free books and practicing ways you can help your child become a stronger reader, too. If you want to come, but missed the deadline, please email me ASAP!

What’s happening in ELI? Letters and letter sounds, books and more books!

We have been working on matching letters to sounds by looking at pictures, saying what we see and finding the letter to match the sound our mouth makes when we begin to say the word.

We read our own books every day! Good readers always look at the picture first and point under each word. We each have 5-7 books in our own box that we read each day. Some books belong to the school and some books are made for each child. When your child brings home their own books, you should keep them so your child can read them again and again. WHY?

Familiar reading is purposeful in helping your child become a confident reader.

A few reminders….

1. Each time your child reads a book they have read before, they discover something new about the print, story, language or pictures in the book.

2. Sounding out words is NOT an effective strategy for students who struggle and are in special reading programs, as your child is, at school. Just think how it sounds when a child tries to sound out the word l-o-o-k-i-n-g. It is best if your child gets the word started with its beginning letter sound and then thinks what word would make sense. Your child may have to try this a few times before he or she figures the word out, but that is OK. We use this strategy every day in Reading Support.

3. Good readers read EVERY SINGLE NIGHT. Reading books more than one time allows your child to see words again and again, freeing up their mind to think more about the message, and encourages confidence and fluency. When your child reads fluently, their reading sounds like talking.

Ms. Fergusson

ELI Letter 2

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Reading Recovery Letter 2

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Reading Recovery Letter 1

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Links

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